Diesel prices rose in June

 

Diesel prices increased in the last week of June after previous months of decline.

“The national average price for a gallon of on-highway diesel rose 3.7 cents in the week ended June 23 to $3.919, according to the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration,” reported Overdrive Magazine. “That increase broke a string of seven weeks in a row that the national price had fallen, last week hitting its lowest point since the end of 2013.”

Other findings from the report include:

· The DOE predicted in April the national average price would drop this summer to an average of $3.87.
· Year over year, the average price is up 8.1 cents.
· Prices for the week rose in all regions of the U.S, surging 5.9 cents on the West Coast, 4.3 cents on the Gulf Coast and 4 cents in the Midwest.
· California had the country’s most expensive diesel at $4.119 per gallon, followed by New England’s $4.102 and the Central Atlantic’s $4.071.
· The Gulf Coast, despite the jump this week, still had the country’s cheapest diesel, $3.813, followed by the Midwest’s $3.875 and the Lower Atlantic’s $3.893.

Despite the recent drop in fuel prices, truck carriers continue to look for ways to improve fuel efficiency and lawmakers are also looking for ways to reduce air pollution.

While lawmakers look for ways to cut down on air pollution a growing number of trucks are being added to the nation’s roads and highways every month as the demand for trucking services continues to increase. The growth felt in the trucking sector is leading to a growing demand for more truck drivers, especially those with professional CDL training from a school like US Truck. Now is the perfect time to start a new truck driving career and US Truck has a CDL training program that can help you take advantage of the rising demand for drivers. As the economy continues to improve, the driver shortage will only get worse and that will be an advantage for applicants with professional CDL training from a school like US Truck.

The need to reduce gas prices will only continue as the truck industry is exploding with growth. Shipping demand continue to rise and that means more trucks, and more truck drivers, will be needed across the country.

The problem with rising diesel prices is that truck carriers can’t just cut back on shipments to save money. As the demand for trucking services continues to grow, carriers have to power through. However, rising diesel prices, along with a shortage of professionally trained commercial truck drivers are some of the challenges today’s truck carriers face in an effort to meet growing demand.

Now is a great time to start a career as a professional truck driver as the future of the industry looks bright, especially as the economy continues to grow. If this is a career you are interested in then starting at the US Truck training program is a great first step. Jobseekers that want to work in a growing industry that offers good pay and benefits, and the chance for long-term stability should look no further than the commercial truck industry, which has a need for thousands of CDL trained drivers.

If you are looking for a good paying career that offers stability, then the trucking sector is a good place to look. But this career also offers the chance to perform an important service to the nation.

Beyond delivering important supplies during times of disaster, America’s trucking industry plays an important role for the overall economy. The majority of cargo shipped in the United States is shipped by a truck and that means few industries have as direct an impact on the national economy as the trucking industry.

Trucking headlines from June

 

Here are some recent headlines from the trucking industry, which continues to grow, add jobs and boost the economy.

CNG partnership in the works

Overdrive Magazine recently reported that “Mainstay Fuel Technologies and Watson Engineering are teaming on Mainstay’s proprietary on-board CNG fuel storage and delivery systems for heavy-duty trucks.” The same article reported that “Watson will provide components and fabrication services.”

“Watson’s broad experience with engineered structural solutions and their long-standing ties to transportation OEMs significantly increases our capabilities to service our fleet customers,” said Rod Grandy, Mainstay’s CEO. He added, “Watson’s manufacturing capacity, combined with our proprietary designs and high-pressure expertise, will enable us to scale quickly and meet the growing market demand for CNG-powered trucks.”

Private-Public partnerships proposed for transportation plan

As truck officials wait for lawmakers to develop a new long-term funding plan for highway and transportation spending, it appears that private-public partnerships might be a part of any new deal.

“Public Private Partnerships will be part of the funding mix in the next highway program but the precise role they will play is not clear,” reported TruckingInfo.com.
“Transportation legislators got a range of views from partnership experts in a Tuesday session before members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.”

One lawmaker has proposed the Partnership to Build America Act, which uses both government and private entities to build and maintain roads and infrastructure.
The bill, which is from Rep. John Delaney, D-Md., has bipartisan support in the House and Senate and would create a tax incentive for private interests to invest $50 billion in infrastructure projects.

“Under the terms of his deal, businesses would buy bonds in return for getting tax-free repatriation of a certain amount of their overseas earnings,” TruckingInfo.com reported. “The $50 billion could be leveraged up to $750 billion in infrastructure financing.

“This approach fuses two concepts,” Delaney said. “It increases investment in infrastructure and it creates incentives to bring dollars home.”

Congestion on the rise as more trucks hit the road

Traffic congestions causes a lot of headaches for Americans and it’s also a problem for the commercial trucking industry.

With more cars and trucks on the road these days, traffic is becoming a regular part of life across the country. It’s become such a big problem that commercial truck carriers are finding themselves having to spend billions of extra dollars each year.

“Congestion on the nation’s Interstate highways added over $9.2 billion in operational costs to the trucking industry in 2013, according to research released Wednesday by the American Transportation Research Institute,” reported TruckingInfo.com. “The group used motor carrier financial data along with billions of anonymous truck GPS data points to calculate congestion delays and costs on each mile of Interstate roadway. Delays totaled over 141 million hours of lost productivity, which equals more than 51,000 truck drivers sitting idle for a working year.”

Good salaries can be found in trucking sector

Employment opportunities are growing across the nation, but many Americans are finding that the high-paying jobs that were available before the recession are no longer in high supply.

The New York Times recently reported that many high-wage and middle-wage jobs have been wiped out over the past few years.

“In essence, the poor economy has replaced good jobs with bad ones,” wrote Annie Lowrey in an April 27 New York Times article. “That is the conclusion of a new report from the National Employment Law Project, a research and advocacy group, analyzing employment trends four years into the recovery.”

While good paying jobs might be hard to find, there is one sector that offers steady employment and good pay. The commercial truck industry has experienced rapid growth in recent years and there are many good paying jobs for those applicants with professional CDL training. Considering a career as a professional truck driver might be the right choice, especially as the nation no longer offers as many good paying jobs as it once did.

Driving a commercial truck today is different than it used to be. However, fall all the changes in technology, health and safety, each truck still requires a professionally trained driver behind the wheel. That means as the industry continues to put more trucks on the road to meet growing demand, there will also be a growing demand for driver with CDL training.

Dashcam captures Good Samaritans helping after highway wreck

 
I-10 Accident in Gulfport, MS

Video Still courtesy of YouTube

Gulfport, MS (WLOX News) — Truck driver David Fredericksen’s dashcam captured a moment no driver wants to witness – when an 18-wheeler collided with a Lincoln Towncar attempting to merge onto the highway.

The accident happened on August 11, 2014 around 5:30pm on Hwy I-10 near exit 49 in Gulfport, Mississippi. In the video posted by his son on YouTube, Fredericksen is seen moving toward the wreck with a fire extinguisher to assist the injured driver. Several Good Samaritans follow him to help before Gulfport Police and Fire arrive on the scene.

WLOX News reports that Scott Swanstrom was driving the 18-wheeler involved in the accident. The driver of the car was at fault in the accident. Swanstrom, the driver, and her young grandchild had minor injuries.

WLOX has more from Swanstrom, plus pictures of the wreckage published. Watch the full YouTube video here.

Get your CDL training with US Truck and start logging your accident-free miles! We train you with the skills and procedures needed to stay safe on the road. Contact us today to see how you can get started.

President sets new truck efficiency standards

 

President Obama ordered new fuel standards for commercial trucks earlier this year, which shows lawmakers will continue to look for ways to offset the pollution caused by the growing number of trucks across the country.

“The new regulations, to be drafted by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Transportation Department by March 2015 and completed a year later so they are in place before President Obama leaves office, are the latest in a series of actions intended to cut back on greenhouse gases without the sort of comprehensive legislation the president failed to push through Congress in his first term,” the New York Times reported earlier this year.

“The limits on greenhouse gas pollution from trucks would combine with previous rules requiring passenger cars and light trucks to burn fuel more efficiently and pending rules to limit the carbon emissions of power plants. Cumulatively, experts said the à la carte approach should enable President Obama to meet his target of cutting carbon pollution in the United States by 17 percent from 2005 levels by 2020. But they said he would still be far short of his goal of an 80 percent reduction by 2050.”

In the same New York Times article, Obama was quoted as saying he saw the new standards as good for the truck industry because it would help drive down oil prices.

“Improving gas mileage for these trucks is going to drive down our oil imports even further,” President Obama said at a Safeway grocery distribution center here, flanked by a Peterbilt truck and Safeway and Coca-Cola cabs. “That reduces carbon pollution even more, cuts down on businesses’ fuel costs, which should pay off in lower prices for consumers. So it’s not just a win-win, it’s a win-win-win. We got three wins.”

It’s no surprise that truck officials have been less than excited about the new standards as “truck manufacturers have lobbied heavily against aggressive increases in federal fuel economy standards, saying that they could increase vehicle prices and diminish safety.”

However, increased fuel efficiency standards appear to be the new reality for truck carriers as the number of trucks hitting the road each month continues to grow. As the demand for CDL training drivers continues to grow, the number of trucks on the highways will also continue to grow.

Other findings from the New York Times article include:

· Republicans have said that the president should not single-handedly impose what they consider onerous requirements on vast swaths of the energy economy when Congress has opted against its own intervention.

· The announcement was part of the president’s vow in his State of the Union address last month to advance his agenda “with or without Congress.” But while most of the actions taken since then have been relatively modest, like ordering a study of job training programs, one area where President Obama both has the power to take more sweeping action and seems intent on using it is the environment.

· In the case of carbon pollution, President Obama has the legal authority under the 1970 Clean Air Act, which requires the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate any substance designated as a pollutant that harms or endangers human health. In 2009, the E.P.A. determined that carbon dioxide, emitted in large quantities from tailpipes and smokestacks, meets that definition.

· While President Obama effectively gave up on comprehensive climate legislation after it stalled in the Senate in his first term, aides said he saw climate change as an area where he could still shape his legacy. He recruited John D. Podesta, a former White House chief of staff for President Bill Clinton, to join his team as counselor in part to direct a more aggressive approach to the issue.

· The administration has recently sought to elevate the issue. Two weeks ago officials announced creation of seven regional “climate hubs” to help farmers adapt to the impact of climate change, like drought and increased pests. Last week in California’s parched Central Valley, President Obama announced a $1 billion “climate resiliency” fund for affected communities. Last weekend while in Jakarta, Secretary of State John Kerry urged Indonesia to sign a major climate treaty and directed American diplomatic missions to make climate change a top priority. The American Trucking Association took a more cautious view, saying that it had worked with the administration on previous rules. “As we begin this new round of standards, A.T.A. hopes the administration will set forth a path that is both based on the best science and research available and economically achievable,” said Bill Graves, the association’s chief executive.

FMCSA closes commenting period for proposed mandate

 

The period for comments on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s proposed electronic logging device (ELD) mandate ended last month.

The CCJ Symposium was held in La Jolla, Calif., last month and “a session devoted to issues surrounding the ELD mandate saw fleet reps from Con-way, Swift and John Christner Trucking speak of their respective fleets’ e-log implementations and associated challenges,” Overdrive Magazine reported. “Overdrive Equipment Editor Jack Roberts covered the panel, in which all speakers emphasized difficulties in implementation and generally positive experiences following.

Overdrive Magazine added that while “owner-operators wouldn’t experience the same length of time for implementation as such large fleets, small fleets have reported a similar dynamic, with some difficulty settling on a system on the market currently that fit their company’s needs well.”

Overdrive magazine conducted a survey this year and asked about the mandate. Findings from the survey include:

· Only 12 percent of readers indicated they were using e-logs for hours of service compliance today — implementation for non-ELD-equipped trucks, should the mandate become final, will be no small matter.

· Among recent commenters, reader Geoff Chausse was among those already running under ELDs (for two years now, he said), and he summed up advantages and disadvantages in commentary under the story at this link. Among the advantages: “I no longer can be tempted to run two days straight. I don’t have to draw lines, figure recaps or figure out where I am.” The disadvantages Chausse named, however, were numerous and, considered on the whole, may represent a safety negative for trucking nationwide, particularly given time pressures of the 14-hour clock in the hours of service rules, he wrote. “I have no choice but to drive in traffic, adverse weather conditions and/or fatigued because I can’t take a nap or avoid adverse conditions because it is tick, tick, ticking away.”

· ELDs also have exacerbated already extant parking shortages, he added. “We all pretty much pick up at the same times, therefore we all run out of hours at about the same times. Slow loading or unloading times affect my overall productivity and paycheck more so then they did before.” In short, Chausse concluded, “they are expensive and restrictive, and should be left as a choice.”

Changes to the truck industry would impact thousands of drivers across the nation. The demand for CDL trained drivers continues to grow and jobseekers looking for a long-term career are turning to the commercial truck industry.

Working as a commercial truck driver can be a rewarding career, especially for a person who appreciates playing such an important role in the national economy. Trucks move America, and as the commercial trucking industry succeeds, so does the national economy. America’s truck drivers play an important role in that process, especially with a shortage of qualified drivers across the country.

Trucks will continue to grow in number across the country as the demand for trucking services continues to rise. US Truck Driving School offers a CDL training program that is helping jobseekers start a long-term career as a professional commercial truck driver, which is especially needed in today’s era of high unemployment. Carriers all across the country are experiencing a shortage of qualified drivers, which makes professional training from a respected school like US Truck Driving School the logical first step in getting work in this growing industry. The quality of education at US Truck Driving School is so good that many students graduate from the CDL training program with multiple job offers and opportunities. Recruiters also work with students to help them find the right commercial truck-driving job on the routes they are looking for in the region they want to live in. There are many opportunities for truck drivers, especially those that have the right kind of training and experience that most carriers are looking for.

Students also benefit from the fact that recruiters at US Truck work to help graduates find employment at some of the best carriers upon completion of the program. In fact, many students complete the CDL training program with multiple job offers waiting for them.
America needs more truck drivers and many Americans need a job. It makes sense that many jobseekers would consider a career as a commercial truck driver, especially considering this will be an in demand career for several years to come.

Diesel prices rose in June

 

Diesel prices increased in the last week of June after previous months of decline.

“The national average price for a gallon of on-highway diesel rose 3.7 cents in the week ended June 23 to $3.919, according to the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration,” reported Overdrive Magazine. “That increase broke a string of seven weeks in a row that the national price had fallen, last week hitting its lowest point since the end of 2013.”

Other findings from the report include:

· The DOE predicted in April the national average price would drop this summer to an average of $3.87.

· Year over year, the average price is up 8.1 cents.

· Prices for the week rose in all regions of the U.S, surging 5.9 cents on the West Coast, 4.3 cents on the Gulf Coast and 4 cents in the Midwest.

· California had the country’s most expensive diesel at $4.119 per gallon, followed by New England’s $4.102 and the Central Atlantic’s $4.071.

· The Gulf Coast, despite the jump this week, still had the country’s cheapest diesel, $3.813, followed by the Midwest’s $3.875 and the Lower Atlantic’s $3.893.

Despite the recent drop in fuel prices, truck carriers continue to look for ways to improve fuel efficiency and lawmakers are also looking for ways to reduce air pollution.

While lawmakers look for ways to cut down on air pollution a growing number of trucks are being added to the nation’s roads and highways every month as the demand for trucking services continues to increase. The growth felt in the trucking sector is leading to a growing demand for more truck drivers, especially those with professional CDL training from a school like US Truck. Now is the perfect time to start a new truck driving career and US Truck has a CDL training program that can help you take advantage of the rising demand for drivers. As the economy continues to improve, the driver shortage will only get worse and that will be an advantage for applicants with professional CDL training from a school like US Truck.

The need to reduce gas prices will only continue as the truck industry is exploding with growth. Shipping demand continue to rise and that means more trucks, and more truck drivers, will be needed across the country.

The problem with rising diesel prices is that truck carriers can’t just cut back on shipments to save money. As the demand for trucking services continues to grow, carriers have to power through. However, rising diesel prices, along with a shortage of professionally trained commercial truck drivers are some of the challenges today’s truck carriers face in an effort to meet growing demand.

Now is a great time to start a career as a professional truck driver as the future of the industry looks bright, especially as the economy continues to grow. If this is a career you are interested in then starting at the US Truck training program is a great first step. Jobseekers that want to work in a growing industry that offers good pay and benefits, and the chance for long-term stability should look no further than the commercial truck industry, which has a need for thousands of CDL trained drivers.

If you are looking for a good paying career that offers stability, then the trucking sector is a good place to look. But this career also offers the chance to perform an important service to the nation.

Beyond delivering important supplies during times of disaster, America’s trucking industry plays an important role for the overall economy. The majority of cargo shipped in the United States is shipped by a truck and that means few industries have as direct an impact on the national economy as the trucking industry.

President sets new truck efficiency standards

 

President Obama ordered new fuel standards for commercial trucks earlier this year, which shows lawmakers will continue to look for ways to offset the pollution caused by the growing number of trucks across the country.

“The new regulations, to be drafted by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Transportation Department by March 2015 and completed a year later so they are in place before Mr. Obama leaves office, are the latest in a series of actions intended to cut back on greenhouse gases without the sort of comprehensive legislation the president failed to push through Congress in his first term,” the New York Times reported earlier this year.

“The limits on greenhouse gas pollution from trucks would combine with previous rules requiring passenger cars and light trucks to burn fuel more efficiently and pending rules to limit the carbon emissions of power plants. Cumulatively, experts said the à la carte approach should enable Mr. Obama to meet his target of cutting carbon pollution in the United States by 17 percent from 2005 levels by 2020. But they said he would still be far short of his goal of an 80 percent reduction by 2050.”

In the same New York Times article, Obama was quoted as saying he saw the new standards as good for the truck industry because it would help drive down oil prices.

“Improving gas mileage for these trucks is going to drive down our oil imports even further,” Mr. Obama said at a Safeway grocery distribution center here, flanked by a Peterbilt truck and Safeway and Coca-Cola cabs. “That reduces carbon pollution even more, cuts down on businesses’ fuel costs, which should pay off in lower prices for consumers. So it’s not just a win-win, it’s a win-win-win. We got three wins.”

It’s no surprise that truck officials have been less than excited about the new standards as “truck manufacturers have lobbied heavily against aggressive increases in federal fuel economy standards, saying that they could increase vehicle prices and diminish safety.”

However, increased fuel efficiency standards appear to be the new reality for truck carriers as the number of trucks hitting the road each month continues to grow. As the demand for CDL training drivers continues to grow, the number of trucks on the highways will also continue to grow.

Other findings from the New York Times article include:

· Republicans have said that the president should not single-handedly impose what they consider onerous requirements on vast swaths of the energy economy when Congress has opted against its own intervention.

· The announcement was part of the president’s vow in his State of the Union address last month to advance his agenda “with or without Congress.” But while most of the actions taken since then have been relatively modest, like ordering a study of job training programs, one area where Mr. Obama both has the power to take more sweeping action and seems intent on using it is the environment.

· In the case of carbon pollution, Mr. Obama has the legal authority under the 1970 Clean Air Act, which requires the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate any substance designated as a pollutant that harms or endangers human health. In 2009, the E.P.A. determined that carbon dioxide, emitted in large quantities from tailpipes and smokestacks, meets that definition.

· While Mr. Obama effectively gave up on comprehensive climate legislation after it stalled in the Senate in his first term, aides said he saw climate change as an area where he could still shape his legacy. He recruited John D. Podesta, a former White House chief of staff for President Bill Clinton, to join his team as counselor in part to direct a more aggressive approach to the issue.

· The administration has recently sought to elevate the issue. Two weeks ago officials announced creation of seven regional “climate hubs” to help farmers adapt to the impact of climate change, like drought and increased pests. Last week in California’s parched Central Valley, Mr. Obama announced a $1 billion “climate resiliency” fund for affected communities. Last weekend while in Jakarta, Secretary of State John Kerry urged Indonesia to sign a major climate treaty and directed American diplomatic missions to make climate change a top priority. The American Trucking Association took a more cautious view, saying that it had worked with the administration on previous rules. “As we begin this new round of standards, A.T.A. hopes the administration will set forth a path that is both based on the best science and research available and economically achievable,” said Bill Graves, the association’s chief executive.

FMCSA closes commenting period for proposed mandate

 

The period for comments on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s proposed electronic logging device (ELD) mandate ended last month.

The CCJ Symposium was held in La Jolla, Calif., last month and “a session devoted to issues surrounding the ELD mandate saw fleet reps from Con-way, Swift and John Christner Trucking speak of their respective fleets’ e-log implementations and associated challenges,” Overdrive Magazine reported.Overdrive Equipment Editor Jack Roberts covered the panel, in which all speakers emphasized difficulties in implementation and generally positive experiences following.”

Overdrive Magazine added that while “owner-operators wouldn’t experience the same length of time for implementation as such large fleets, small fleets have reported a similar dynamic, with some difficulty settling on a system on the market currently that fit their company’s needs well.”

Overdrive magazine conducted a survey this year and asked about the mandate. Findings from the survey include:

· Only 12 percent of readers indicated they were using e-logs for hours of service compliance today — implementation for non-ELD-equipped trucks, should the mandate become final, will be no small matter.

· Among recent commenters, reader Geoff Chausse was among those already running under ELDs (for two years now, he said), and he summed up advantages and disadvantages in commentary under the story at this link. Among the advantages: “I no longer can be tempted to run two days straight. I don’t have to draw lines, figure recaps or figure out where I am.” The disadvantages Chausse named, however, were numerous and, considered on the whole, may represent a safety negative for trucking nationwide, particularly given time pressures of the 14-hour clock in the hours of service rules, he wrote. “I have no choice but to drive in traffic, adverse weather conditions and/or fatigued because I can’t take a nap or avoid adverse conditions because it is tick, tick, ticking away.”

· ELDs also have exacerbated already extant parking shortages, he added. “We all pretty much pick up at the same times, therefore we all run out of hours at about the same times. Slow loading or unloading times affect my overall productivity and paycheck more so then they did before.” In short, Chausse concluded, “they are expensive and restrictive, and should be left as a choice.”

Changes to the truck industry would impact thousands of drivers across the nation. The demand for CDL trained drivers continues to grow and jobseekers looking for a long-term career are turning to the commercial truck industry.

Working as a commercial truck driver can be a rewarding career, especially for a person who appreciates playing such an important role in the national economy. Trucks move America, and as the commercial trucking industry succeeds, so does the national economy. America’s truck drivers play an important role in that process, especially with a shortage of qualified drivers across the country.

Trucks will continue to grow in number across the country as the demand for trucking services continues to rise. US Truck Driving School offers a CDL training program that is helping jobseekers start a long-term career as a professional commercial truck driver, which is especially needed in today’s era of high unemployment. Carriers all across the country are experiencing a shortage of qualified drivers, which makes professional training from a respected school like US Truck Driving School the logical first step in getting work in this growing industry. The quality of education at US Truck Driving School is so good that many students graduate from the CDL training program with multiple job offers and opportunities. Recruiters also work with students to help them find the right commercial truck-driving job on the routes they are looking for in the region they want to live in. There are many opportunities for truck drivers, especially those that have the right kind of training and experience that most carriers are looking for.

Students also benefit from the fact that recruiters at US Truck work to help graduates find employment at some of the best carriers upon completion of the program. In fact, many students complete the CDL training program with multiple job offers waiting for them.

America needs more truck drivers and many Americans need a job. It makes sense that many jobseekers would consider a career as a commercial truck driver, especially considering this will be an in demand career for several years to come.

Trucking headlines from June

 

Here are some recent headlines from the trucking industry, which continues to grow, add jobs and boost the economy.

CNG partnership in the works

Overdrive Magazine recently reported that “Mainstay Fuel Technologies and Watson Engineering are teaming on Mainstay’s proprietary on-board CNG fuel storage and delivery systems for heavy-duty trucks.” The same article reported that “Watson will provide components and fabrication services.”

“Watson’s broad experience with engineered structural solutions and their long-standing ties to transportation OEMs significantly increases our capabilities to service our fleet customers,” said Rod Grandy, Mainstay’s CEO. He added, “Watson’s manufacturing capacity, combined with our proprietary designs and high-pressure expertise, will enable us to scale quickly and meet the growing market demand for CNG-powered trucks.”

Private-Public partnerships proposed for transportation plan

As truck officials wait for lawmakers to develop a new long-term funding plan for highway and transportation spending, it appears that private-public partnerships might be a part of any new deal.

“Public Private Partnerships will be part of the funding mix in the next highway program but the precise role they will play is not clear,” reported TruckingInfo.com.
“Transportation legislators got a range of views from partnership experts in a Tuesday session before members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.”

One lawmaker has proposed the Partnership to Build America Act, which uses both government and private entities to build and maintain roads and infrastructure.
The bill, which is from Rep. John Delaney, D-Md., has bipartisan support in the House and Senate and would create a tax incentive for private interests to invest $50 billion in infrastructure projects.

“Under the terms of his deal, businesses would buy bonds in return for getting tax-free repatriation of a certain amount of their overseas earnings,” TruckingInfo.com reported. “The $50 billion could be leveraged up to $750 billion in infrastructure financing.

“This approach fuses two concepts,” Delaney said. “It increases investment in infrastructure and it creates incentives to bring dollars home.”

Congestion on the rise as more trucks hit the road

Traffic congestions causes a lot of headaches for Americans and it’s also a problem for the commercial trucking industry.

With more cars and trucks on the road these days, traffic is becoming a regular part of life across the country. It’s become such a big problem that commercial truck carriers are finding themselves having to spend billions of extra dollars each year.

“Congestion on the nation’s Interstate highways added over $9.2 billion in operational costs to the trucking industry in 2013, according to research released Wednesday by the American Transportation Research Institute,” reported TruckingInfo.com. “The group used motor carrier financial data along with billions of anonymous truck GPS data points to calculate congestion delays and costs on each mile of Interstate roadway. Delays totaled over 141 million hours of lost productivity, which equals more than 51,000 truck drivers sitting idle for a working year.”

Good salaries can be found in trucking sector

Employment opportunities are growing across the nation, but many Americans are finding that the high-paying jobs that were available before the recession are no longer in high supply.

The New York Times recently reported that many high-wage and middle-wage jobs have been wiped out over the past few years.

“In essence, the poor economy has replaced good jobs with bad ones,” wrote Annie Lowrey in an April 27 New York Times article. “That is the conclusion of a new report from the National Employment Law Project, a research and advocacy group, analyzing employment trends four years into the recovery.”

While good paying jobs might be hard to find, there is one sector that offers steady employment and good pay. The commercial truck industry has experienced rapid growth in recent years and there are many good paying jobs for those applicants with professional CDL training. Considering a career as a professional truck driver might be the right choice, especially as the nation no longer offers as many good paying jobs as it once did.

Driving a commercial truck today is different than it used to be. However, fall all the changes in technology, health and safety, each truck still requires a professionally trained driver behind the wheel. That means as the industry continues to put more trucks on the road to meet growing demand, there will also be a growing demand for driver with CDL training.

Using your Post 9/11 GI Bill at USTDS

 

Use your Post 9/11 GI Bill at USTDSUS Truck Driving School proudly offers financial assistance to military veterans, active service members, reservists, dependents and spouses under several different programs – including the Post 9/11 GI Bill.

The Post 9/11 GI Bill is available for training at non-college-degree Institutions, including truck driver training for a Class A CDL. Under this program, the benefit covers the actual costs for tuition and fees, up to the national maximum. Payments are issued monthly after the training is completed. The monthly entitlement is based on the number of clock hours you attend training during each week of the month. The payment amount varies depending on the GI Bill program you are utilizing, how long your qualifying military service was, and the type of non-college-degree school you are attending.

If you have at least 90 days of aggregate active duty service after Sept. 10, 2001, and are still on active duty, or if you are an honorably discharged Veteran or were discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days, you may be eligible for this VA-administered program.

To find out more about using your Post 9/11 GI Bill for your CDL training, or to see what other Financial Aid US Truck Driving School has available to Military Veterans, visit http://www.ustruck.com/veterans/. To speak with a Financial Aid Advisor, call us at 888.308.8170

All information regarding the Post 9/11 GI Bill can be obtained by visiting http://benefits.va.gov/gibill/